+44 (0) 1896 870 277 gisela@simplyjikidenreiki.co.uk
Stressed and overwhelmed? Discover Reiki for self-care, contentment and resilience

Stressed and overwhelmed? Discover Reiki for self-care, contentment and resilience

Why I’m so grateful to have Jikiden Reiki in my life

A guest post by Elaine Rainey

AFTER COMING TO THE END of a lengthy busy period at work, I’ve been dedicating some time to long and luxurious Reiki self-treatment.  For me, it’s a rare treat to set aside exclusive time for such things and it feels wonderful.  As I place my hands on my body, I can feel the tension easing in my shoulders, the heat building up in my body and something gently softening in my chest.  I’m feeling so grateful to have Reiki in my life, making me feel so good.

Elaine Rainey, ecologist

When I look back through my diary at what I have achieved over this past few months, I’ve surprised myself at how I have managed to navigate this with my mind and body remaining in such a good place.  It reminds me of author and film producer Jeff Brown’s words:

“There is a time to adventure heartily into new possibilities, but there is also a need for quiet integration time on the self-creation journey. We can have all the peak experiences we want but the real work happens between the peaks, while laying down and integrating on the valley floor. Growers are inch worms. Lasting transformation is an incremental process, one soul-step at a time. This may frustrate us, but it’s the only way to craft an awareness that is authentic and sustainable.”

Jeff’s words made me realise that this is exactly what I have been doing over this past few months, slowly but surely keeping Reiki integrated into my life, whenever and wherever I could, in the spaces between the busyness.  And it has paid off with a level of productivity that I didn’t think would be possible a few months ago, when I looked out towards the daunting list of tasks that lay ahead of me.

The purpose of this story is not to advocate Reiki as another ‘tool’ to help us become more efficient, productive versions of ourselves.  It is simply to express gratitude to a simple yet powerful practice that, if committed to over time, can transform our lives.

Jikiden Reiki training has been one of the best investments that I have ever made for my health and wellbeing.  I am so grateful for the many ways that my Reiki practice has changed my life.  For me, however, the most wonderful change has been to the level of contentment I now feel.  This is not a kind of contentment that succumbs to the ebb and flow of life’s experiences.  This kind of contentment has resilience, it’s authentic and unwavering.  It’s the kind that has slowly crept up on me while I’ve been faithfully placing my hands on my body, night after night, in dedicated, regular practice.

Elaine RaineyElaine Rainey works as an ecologist and Jikiden Reiki practitioner and junior teacher based in Scotland, UK. Jikiden Reiki is a traditional style of Japanese Reiki, making a strong effort to keep the practice as close to its original form as possible. Elaine works with fellow Reiki practitioners and teachers to promote the benefits of Reiki, to support others through their healing journey and to encourage people to learn this wonderful healing art for themselves.

In September 2013, you will be able to learn authentic Reiki with Yamaguchi Sensei , the head of the Jikiden Reiki Institute in Kyoto, right here in Scotland. Until 2000, this level of in-depth understanding of Reiki practice had been locked inside Japan, with the first Westerners training in Kyoto in 2000, and it was only from the early 2000s that Tadao Yamaguchi started travelling to many Western countries to spread Reiki in its original Japanese form.

Jikiden Reiki Training with Tadao Yamaguchi in Scotland
Edinburgh 6th September – 9th September 2013

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If interested in this incredible training opportunity contact Gisela Stewart.

Mainstreaming Reiki – Lessons from the Mindfulness Movement

Mainstreaming Reiki – Lessons from the Mindfulness Movement

 A guest blog by Elaine Rainey

The Healing Power of Reiki image

When Mikao Usui founded the method of Reiki Ryoho in the 1920s, he was determined not to keep it for his own benefit but to share it with society.  He believed that Reiki should be made accessible to everyone, to help people improve their physical wellbeing, peace of mind and happiness*.  This was an unusual position to hold in a culture where keeping such things within the family (in order to protect the wealth that could be generated from it) was common.

If we are to carry on the legacy of Mikao Usui, what are our options for bringing Reiki to society at large, so that all can benefit?  What steps can we take to avoid the pitfalls that might discourage the general population from giving Reiki a try?

If we consider the mindfulness movement, pioneers such as Jon Kabat-Zinn have integrated mindfulness into the mainstream with so much success that it is now widely used in a variety of settings, from hospitals to prisons to staff wellness programmes within large multi-national companies.  It has taken decades to achieve such success, but if we look back to the formative years, it becomes clear that the mindfulness pioneers had developed a winning formula from which to work.

The Editorial within the latest edition of Buddhist journal Shambhala Sun contains a useful insight into how the pioneers of the Western mindfulness movement presented their practice in the early days, in order to remove potential barriers that would prevent it from filtering into the mainstream. They focused on communicating the following three principles that they hoped would make the practice as accepted, universal and helpful as possible:

1. It is secular (available to all, regardless of belief).

2. It is evidence-based (validated by personal experience and sound science).

3. It is beneficial to our lives right now (to our health, happiness, families, society etc.).

If we consider these three principles in the context of Reiki, it becomes clear that our goal is arguably very much the same and that we have much to learn from how the mindfulness movement has approached the task that we as a community now have ahead of us.

1. Reiki is secular: Mikao Usui stated in the Kokai Denju that “all living things possess this incredible ability”.  Once trained, anyone can practice Reiki, regardless of their belief system.

 2. Reiki is evidence-based: Small but reputable studies on the benefits of Reiki are emerging (see http://reikiinmedicine.org/medical-papers/) but we have yet to see good quality, large scale studies demonstrating its efficacy. However, this should not leave us disheartened.  As a community, we have many success stories to tell.  Such testimonies may not be appropriate for convincing the medical community of the efficacy of Reiki but for the general population, a well-articulated testimony from someone they trust can have much more impact than a piece of published research ever could.  Numerous testimonials have been published showing the different ways in which Reiki has helped people. For example, you can read about Reiki for stress management at http://on.fb.me/VlvfB8, Reiki with Autism at http://bit.ly/11f5s4z or Reiki in acute trauma at http://on.fb.me/WMDc3z.

 3. Reiki is beneficial to our lives right now: Once we learn Reiki, we can use it right away to support ourselves, our friends, families and communities.  The energy is the same whether we have been practicing for years or for just a few days.  Being a beginner should not be seen as a barrier to efficacy.  Once we have Reiki in our lives, it will always be at hand when we need it, helping us to cope with whatever challenges life throws at us.

In continuing the legacy of Mikao Usui, we all have an important part to play.  Whether Reiki stays exclusively within our hearts, shining out towards others and speaking to them without words; whether the impact stays exclusively within our families or whether it extends to the setting up of research projects within our local communities or further afield; we are all contributing to positive change, to the changing of hearts and minds in such a way that Reiki will one day be considered as truly integrated into society at large.

* Taken from the Kokai Denju, a rare interview with Mikao Usui (the founder of Reiki practice) about the system of Reiki.

Elaine Rainey
Elaine has been a Jikiden Reiki practitioner for a number of years and has recently become a Jikiden Reiki teacher (Shihan Kaku).

You can connect with her on her facebook pages ‘Jikiden Reiki Treatments’ and ‘Song of Reiki’

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