+44 (0) 1896 870 277 gisela@simplyjikidenreiki.co.uk
Mikao Usui found his healing ability after a retreat on Mount Kurama

"Reiki will conquer the world and heal its inhabitants as well as the Earth itself." Mikao Usui

A lesson in limits for Jikiden Reiki practitioners

Guest blog by Elaine Rainey

At a recent UN High Level Meeting on Wellbeing and Happiness, discussion turned to how the concept of Gross National Happiness (an innovative economic model originally developed in Bhutan, a Buddhist country with a longstanding tradition of mindfulness) could be applied to the rest of the world.  Discussion inevitably turned to the difficulties faced by undertaking such a task on such a grand scale.

At this point, famous environmentalist Hunter Lovins took to the stage and addressed the audience with a parable about a humble hummingbird.  She said:

When the forest was on fire and all of the animals were fleeing around her, the hummingbird was ferrying droplets of water in her tiny beak, one by one, to try and staunch the flames. “What are you doing?” her distinguished animal colleagues asked. “The best I can”, replied the hummingbird.

As Reiki practitioners, we are armed with such a wonderful healing resource in the palm of our hands.  By nature, we tend to be a compassionate bunch who are sensitive to the suffering of others.  The desire to help and to ease the suffering of others is often strong.  Starting out with the best of intentions, we can soon find ourselves overwhelmed and burnt out.  An image of a stressed out Reiki practitioner providing distant treatments to many people simultaneously at the end of a long day springs to mind.

So, what can we do to avoid this and to deliver a sustained and healthy level of service to others through our Reiki practice?
The answer, from a Jikiden Reiki perspective, is one step at a time, one person at a time.  We are taught to start with ourselves, our family and friends, then moving out into the community around us.  We are not taught methods for sending distant Reiki to many people simultaneously, or to specific areas or disaster situations.  Just one person at a time.

I remember, at a Jikiden Reiki seminar, a Reiki practitioner asked Tadao Yamaguchi, the Head of the Jikiden Reiki Institute in Japan, for advice on someone they were treating distantly for a serious illness.  This person lived many, many miles away and the practitioner did not know them personally.  This practitioner was actually asking about specifics of the treatment approach, but Tadao Yamaguchi politely asked “Why are you treating this person so far away?
A fruitful discussion developed between the participating practitioners, resulting in a contact being made with a Jikiden Reiki practioner who lived locally to the person needing help.The point was not about never sending distant Reiki to people we do not know, or to those far afield.  It was about keeping things simple, being practical and drawing on the resources of others if required.
This is something I personally value very much about Jikiden Reiki.  The approach is very humble, straightforward, simple, grounded and manageable.  One person at a time, being relaxed, doing the ‘best we can’.

You can follow the progress of the UN High Level Meeting on Wellbeing and Happiness, and the thoughful write-ups by Claudia Chender MacLellan, at http://www.shambhalasun.com/sunspace

Connect with Elaine on facebook: @Jikiden Reiki Treatments

Photo credit: Zlatica Retzler (many thanks!)

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